Alternatively, you can also become an affiliate for brands and make residual passive income through commissions from every sale you generate through your channel. This works especially well if you review products as part of your YouTube channel. Since there's no risk involved on the brand's end (they only pay when they make sales), there's usually a low bar to getting started.
You don’t need expensive hardware to get going. Content is far more important than having 4K or 360-degree video. Great quality helps, but today’s smartphones are more than good enough to start with. That said, good lighting is very important: natural is great, if you can be outdoors, or near a window, or pick up some lighting kits that start at a couple of hundred dollars. Clear audio is critical, too; you can buy a highly-rated clip-on lavalier (“lav”) mic starting at only $23.
YouTube offers some useful analytics in your Channel menu. Here you can identify your audience’s age, gender, geographic location and watch time. You can see the number of views on each video and your traffic source (how your viewers are finding your videos). After you’ve monetized your channel  (more on that soon), you will also be able to view estimated earnings and ad performance.
Look for different revenue sources. Timmy Linetsky, a popular YouTube musician, says: "You can earn money a couple of different ways. There's the ad revenue, but then there are also sponsorship opportunities from companies, which is a nice chunk of change every once in a while. I turned my channel into a business through pushing private lessons, which has been my main source of income. I also used my channel to get a job at the school I teach at. They saw I have this presence on YouTube and that I can teach. I also do Patreon so people can support me through that, and I get commissioned work."
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